What Pages Does My Website Need?

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Today I’m going to be talking about what pages you need on your website. The reason I wanted to talk about this today is because every Tuesday for the next few weeks, I’m going to release a bonus episode specifically about some of the most important pages on your website. I’m going to talk about trends, what’s working and what isn’t, and what you can do to create a strategic design for each of those pages.

We’re going to start today talking about which pages you might need depending on your type of business. I’m going over why choosing the right pages for your website is important, the goal of your website and how it affects those pages, and creating a journey to get people to take action.

Topics Discussed:

  • Why choosing the right pages for your website is important
  • The goal of your website and how it affects the pages you need
  • Creating a journey for your website visitors
  • How to decide which pages your website needs
  • Pages you need, but may have forgotten about

Resources Discussed:

Action Steps:

  1. If you haven’t already, choose the three goals you have for your website

  2. Write down the journey a visitor takes from first landing on your website to taking action on your goal

  3. List any pages you are missing and need to add to your website


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Why choosing the right pages for your website is important

Your website is the one location you control - and it’s the first impression most people will have of your business. Your website design should reflect your brand’s mission, vision, and style as it connects with your dream clients.

When you throw everything you’re interested in, every detail of what you do, or every option someone has on your website, you overwhelm them. They won’t know what you’re best at or where to start.

Instead, keep things simple by choosing only the pages you need to have and creating guides or other resources for things that can happen away from your website.

The goal of your website and how it affects the pages you need

Before you start the design process, it's important to have a bigger goal for your website. This goal should support your business goals and will help you design in a way that helps your business grow.

Ask yourself:

  • If your website could do just one thing, what would it be?

These are some of the most popular goals creative small businesses set for their websites. Each will affect the way you design differently.

  • Growing an email list
  • Sharing content and educating your audience
  • Booking consult calls with your dream clients
  • Selling a certain product or course

Creating a journey for your website visitors

Before you begin designing or updating your website, it’s important that you determine the ultimate goal of your website and create a journey that move visitors from landing on your home page to getting in contact with you or buying from you.

Your website isn’t about you – it’s about your dream clients. You need to focus on their pain points, their dreams, and the transformation they get from working with you. Once you know those things, you can lay out the information they need to take action.

Ask yourself:

  • What steps do your dream clients need to take in order to take action?
  • Working backwards, what is first step someone should take on your website?

Then:

  • Choose the action you want visitors to take based on your goals.
  • Create a single call-to-action for each page.
  • Eliminate distractions that take people away from your website.

How to decide which pages your website needs

In order to figure out what pages you need on your website make sure you consider the type of business you have. Some pages are needed on every website, while others will be specific to your type of business.

Types of Websites:

  • Selling services and informational products (digital downloads, courses, etc.)
  • Selling services where the service is the product (either in person or online)
  • Selling services that have a visual product
  • Selling products in an online shop (physical or digital)
  • Selling locally (products or services)
  • Blogging as the main website

Pages Needed on Every Website

  • Home - Your home page is the most important page of your website because it will be the first impression most people have of you. The goal of your home page is to communicate who you are, what you do, where a visitor should start on your website, and to inspire them to action. Make their decision about what to do next easy and get them into your content ASAP. This is a great place to include an appealing opt-in.
  • About - Your about page isn’t really about you, it’s about your dream client. People are going to check you out before they decide to invest time or money into your business. They want to know what you can do for them right now. If you have an online business, whether you’re supporting it through a blog or not, your need a solid About Page that’s easy to find and targeted to your ideal client.
  • Blog - Your blog is so much more than simply sharing images or talking about your work - it’s where you can start to educate your clients and give them a behind-the-scenes peek into what you do.
  • Contact - Getting people to contact you should be the ultimate goal of your website, so it’s important that your contact page sets you up for success.

If you sell services and informational products…

  • Services - Your services page is probably going to be your most content-heavy page because you want to share a lot of information, but you can improve the design by removing distractions (such as a call-to-action in your banner image), breaking up your content into smaller chunks, and making it easy to get in touch with you.
  • Products – If you sell multiple products, you should have a page where visitors can easily find them all in one place. This page should be organized by category, such as topic, type of offer, or who the product is for. Highlight the benefits customers will receive.
  • Testimonials – This is where you house your testimonials, press, or featured posts. You can also show any awards or accolades you’ve received that are relevant to your field. These can be on a separate page, but should also be sprinkled throughout your website.
  • Sales Page (optional) – If you choose to, you can have a separate sales page for each of your services or higher priced products (like courses). This takes the place of your Product and testimonials pages since they will both be included here.

If you sell services where the service is the product…

  • Services - Your services page is probably going to be your most content-heavy page because you want to share a lot of information, but you can improve the design by removing distractions (such as a call-to-action in your banner image), breaking up your content into smaller chunks, and making it easy to get in touch with you.

  • Testimonials – This is where you house your testimonials, press, or featured posts. You can also show any awards or accolades you’ve received that are relevant to your field. These can be on a separate page, but should also be sprinkled throughout your website.
  • Sales Page (optional) – If you choose to, you can have a separate sales page for each of your services or higher priced products (like courses). This takes the place of your Product and testimonials pages since they will both be included here.

If you sell services that have a visual product…

  • Services - Your services page is probably going to be your most content-heavy page because you want to share a lot of information, but you can improve the design by removing distractions (such as a call-to-action in your banner image), breaking up your content into smaller chunks, and making it easy to get in touch with you.
  • Portfolio - Your portfolio is a great way to show off what you do and connect with your dream client. It’s important that you use this page to show the type of work you want to be known for - not every project needs to be included here. If you have a lot of items to share, consider creating sections based on style or event type so visitors can easily find what they’re looking for.
  • Testimonials – This is where you house your testimonials, press, or featured posts. You can also show any awards or accolades you’ve received that are relevant to your field. These can be on a separate page, but should also be sprinkled throughout your website.
  • Sales Page (optional) – If you choose to, you can have a separate sales page for each of your services or higher priced products (like courses). This takes the place of your Product and testimonials pages since they will both be included here.

If you sell products in an online shop…

  • Collections – If you sell multiple products, you should have pages where visitors can easily find them by type. You need to organize this in a way that makes sense for your visitors and makes it easy for them to buy.
  • Products – For ease of shopping and SEO, you need a separate page for each product you sell. This is where visitors can learn more about the product, looks at the available options, read reviews, and see any tips for use.
  • Policies – This is different from your website policies, as these will tell customers what to expect once they purchase. You should include information about returns, exchanges, shipping, delivery times and other important information.
  • FAQs – Address any concerns that possible customers may have that prevent them from purchasing. By having a page dedicated to this, you can save yourself time answering questions and make them feel more comfortable that you are an expert at your product.

If you sell locally …

  • Menu / Offer – Let people know what to expect before they visit your location. If you sell food, include a current menu. If you sell products, give an overview of the types of items you carry. If you offer services, let people know the value you bring. If you want to list prices on your website, focus on the benefits of your service to prevent price shopping.
  • Location – In addition to your address, you should include information about how to get to your location (maps are great), tips for parking, and hours.
  • Calendar (optional) – If you host events or specials, you can include a calendar that has that information all in one place.

If your blog is your main website…

  • Categories – Make it easy for visitors to search the content you’ve created by setting up pages for each category of posts. You should also have a search feature that’s easy to use and looks at the content of a post, not just the title.

  • Sidebar – While not a separate page, the sidebar is a great place to include important information in one place that can be seen throughout your website
  • Social Sharing – Make it easy for visitors to share your posts to social media. This is essential to build traffic and gain authority. You should set up the ability to share from a post to Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and email.

Pages you need, but may have forgotten about

  • Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy - As a business, you’re legally required to have terms and conditions (and a Privacy Policy) on your website - especially if you’re selling services, products or collecting email addresses. Not doing so equals big potential trouble - like stolen content or hefty fines.
  • Thank You page – This is the page that visitors will be directed to after they opt-in for something on your website or submit a form. This is a great place to include a small offer for sale or to collect information about a visitor’s pain points.
  • Short “sales” page for each opt-in – If you have multiple opt-ins, it may be helpful to have a short page for each where you explain what the opt-in is, who it’s for, and the benefits of downloading it. This helps sell your freebie and also makes it easy to share and track where people are joining your email list from.
  • Login screen for membership area – If you have a membership area or password protected page, make sure to design it to fit the rest of your website.
  • 404 page customized to fit your design and dream clients – When a visitor clicks on a page that no longer exists, they are directed to a 404 page. Instead of the generic “we can’t find the page you’re looking for” message, customize the page to include your voice, some popular options visitors might be interested in, and a way to take action towards your goal.